Premium Funding: Information & Impact

What is Pupil Premium?

Schools receive additional income called the Pupil Premium. This money is allocated by the Government to help schools support children from low income families and children in care. The amount of additional funding schools receive is based on the number of children who are entitled to receive free school meals or have been in the past 6 years or are looked after children. “Disadvantaged pupils’ is used to refer to only those pupils for whom the pupil premium provides support.

What is Pupil Premium?

Schools receive additional income called the Pupil Premium. This money is allocated by the Government to help schools support children from low income families and children in care. The amount of additional funding schools receive is based on the number of children who are entitled to receive free school meals or have been in the past 6 years or are looked after children. “Disadvantaged pupils’ is used to refer to only those pupils for whom the pupil premium provides support.

Nationally, disadvantaged children attain less and make slower progress when compared to other students. The most recent available figures for the ‘national’ picture show that this gap continues to grow.  Pupil Premium money has been given to help schools close this gap.

The pupil premium provides support for pupils who:

1. were registered as eligible for free school meals at any point in the last 6 years (FSM)
2. have been looked after for 1 day or more (CLA)
3. were adopted from care on or after 30 December 2005, or left care under:
 - a special guardianship order
 - a child arrangements order (CLA)

Delivering support and measuring impact

Schools are required to publish information on how pupil premium funding is used and how it's impact is measured.  This information can be found in our Premium Funding Strategy below.

Impact of other student support (catch-up premiums) at Alexandra Park School

Schools also receive funding to deliver other types of additional support. APS delivers support and catch up for students under three such funding streams:

  • Year 7 Literacy and Numeracy Catch Up Premium
  • 16 to 19 Tuition fund
  • Covid 19 Catch Up Premium

What is the Year 7 Literacy and Numeracy Catch Up Premium?

The literacy and numeracy catch-up premium gives state-funded schools, including special schools and alternative provision settings, additional funding to support year 7 pupils who did not achieve the expected standard in reading or maths at the end of key stage 2 (KS2).

The catch up funding is designed to ensure that students who have not achieved their potential at KS2 are not disadvantaged by this and are provided with the opportunity to ensure they have the same equality of opportunity as their peers by the time they leave compulsory education.

What is the 16 to 19 Tuition fund?

The Department of Education announced funding to support students whose learning was disrupted as a result of the COVID pandemic. This 16-19 Tuition Fund is available to all 16 to 19 providers and is ring-fenced for 16 to 19 small group tuition only.

The funding can be used to support small group tuition for 16 to 19 students in English, maths, and other courses where learning has been disrupted. The guidance indicates that the supported students must be on a 16 to 19 study programme and have not achieved grade 5 or above in GCSE maths and/or English by age 16. The subjects covered in the tuition will not be limited to English and maths, but will be identified according to need and existing programmes.

What is the Covid 19 Catch Up Premium?

In light of the ongoing disruption experienced by students during the COVID pandemic, the DfE has allocated £650 million to schools to support these students to reach their full potential, despite the unique challenges they face.

Whilst it is for headteachers to decide how this funding is used, the Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) has published guidance on effective interventions to support schools.

For example, for pupils with complex needs schools are guided to use this funding for catch-up support to address individual needs. There is also an allocation of £350 million for a National Tutoring Programme, intended to deliver proven and successful tuition to the most disadvantaged and vulnerable young people.

Delivering support and measuring impact

Schools are required to publish information on how Catch-Up premium and other additional support funding is used and how its impact is measured. This information can be found in our Premium Funding Strategy document below.

16-19 tuition fund statement
Premium funding strategy